Calculating A Landlord’s Buy-to-Let Property Investment Returns

How do Landlords calculate their returns on their property investments?

Buying a residential investment property is very different to buying a home. For a start what landlords are really buying is a property investment and letting business. Therefore a key part of a landlord’s decision making process of whether to invest or not in a buy-to-let property will partly be made on the basis of what their likely investment returns will be.

What is involved in calculating property investment returns?

The process of calculating investment returns can be very complicated indeed. On commercial property investors will go to great lengths to use techniques which discount future cash-flows (DCF) from individual investments to work out the potential returns and in turn their value.

Luckily for residential landlords life doesn’t get anywhere near this complicated. The essence of calculating an investment return on property is to understand that there are two factors influencing what investment return is generated. Firstly; through income in the form of rent and secondly in the form of the capital appreciation resulting from rising house prices. Total returns to an investor are the sum of both.

Investment returns from a rental business

The other complication for a landlord is that buying a residential investment property is not just like buying a straight forward investment. It is actually running a business. Therefore what a landlord needs to include in their calculation are the associated costs of running that business.

The main revenue source for a landlords business is obviously the rental income.

The complication for landlords is that in calculating their net returns they need to include net income (after expenses) and add this to capital appreciation. This needs to be done for the entire investment period. A landlord will typically hold a residential investment property for approximately 15 years according to on going surveys from the Association of Residential Letting Agents (ARLA).

The final complication is that rent and other costs are likely to change over the investment period and this needs to be factored into the calculation of a landlords investment returns.

Set up & exit costs

Setting up a residential investment will mean that a landlord incurs certain set up or one off costs of bringing the investment into being. These costs include the initial costs involved in the purchase of the investment property such as the legal fees and stamp duty if it is payable. Other capital costs frequently incurred are where any appliances are purchased or if the residential investment property is improved. Finally, there is the cost of exiting the investment when it is sold. All these need to be factored into the overall calculation of a property investors returns.

Accounting for the long-term

One further complication to a landlord trying to calculate their likely returns from a potential residential investment is trying to account for the effect of inflation and the likely growth rate in house prices generally. The Halifax figure reveal that over the last 40 years house prices have been rising at an average rate of 10.3%. However the Barker Report produced by the Government on housing supply concludes that the real rate of growth (after inflation) over the last 30 years has only been 2.4%. Therefore in calculating a residential investment’s long-term returns a landlord will need to be able to predict both of these.

The return on capital

These calculations of returns all relate to the asset value of the investment property and the rental profit after expenses. However, this is not a true measure of the real returns made by a property investor. This is because unlike an investment in a building society a landlord is likely to have borrowed a significant proportion of their investment capital in the form of a mortgage. This means that they are likely to only have put in a proportion of the total capital into the investment.

For example on a £200,000 property they may have put down a 20% deposit or £40,000 into the investment. What this means is that any investment calculations needs to measure what the returns are on that £40,000 and any other additional capital costs not just the £200,000 in order to enable a potential property investor to measure whether the returns are good and likely to be better than investing that money in alternatives such as putting it in the building society.

What returns should Landlords be aiming for?

To some extent the investment returns required will depend on each landlord’s circumstances. For some landlords anything above that available on a building society deposit account would be OK. The real rate of interest from a building society account i.e. the gross rate (before tax) minus inflation is about 3% in real terms. This is pretty low as it reflects the fact that it is a risk free return. Property investment is not risk free and given that a landlord is investing a considerable amount of time, effort and capital it is reasonable to expect a return above this.

A property developer would look to receive a return of about 20% on capital invested. However, carrying out a development is far more risky than an investment. In addition, a development particularly a large one is likely to take place over several years; in which case the annualised returns could easily be halved to say 10%.

If we use these figures as a guide I would say that a long term real return of between 5-10% is OK although not stunning. A landlord has to appreciate that buying a property investment is not passive in the same way as holding a building society account is and running a rental business does involve small amounts of work to keep it on track. Therefore the returns that a landlord should expect from their investment should reflect this. A landlord should be aiming for at least a high single figure and preferably a double figure return on their capital. Anything above 20% is excellent.

Difficulty with predicting long-term returns

Off course, long-term predictions are notoriously difficult. Predicting things like the interest rate, the levels of inflation further out than a couple of years into the future was impossible up until recently. The independence granted to the Bank of England in the late 90′s has had a huge stabilising influence. Hopefully, the UK and the housing market will continue to benefit from this stable investment environment and enable all our property investments to continue to prosper.

Why Invest In Property? 5 Crucial Factors For Financial Freedom

Property Investing For Wealth Creation

Property Investing For Your Retirement Fund

Property Investing For Your Security

Why property is the I.D.E.A.L investment

You want to invest for your future but don’t know which asset class (shares, property or business) to invest your hard earned dollars into?
This is a question that is posed to us time and again. There are benefits and risks when investing in any asset class however we have personally
found that investing in residential property has given us a great return on our investment with the least amount of risk. You can invest in
property even when you have little or no equity, don’t own your own home and have lots of bad debt.

We call property the I.D.E.A.L investment because it provides:

Income

Depreciation

Equity

Appreciation

Leverage

All of the above are critical factors that the rich use so successfully to build their wealth and which you can also use to build your wealth.

Let us explain further why property has been the I.D.E.A.L investment class.

Income – investing in property has allowed us the opportunity to earn additional income on a regular basis through the collection of rent on the property(s).
We use the rent to help pay off the monthly mortgage payments and/or expenses associated with the investment property(s). This along with other benefits allows
us to live a comfortable lifestyle while continuing on with our successful wealth creation strategies.

Our long term strategy is to pay down the mortgages and then use the rental income as disposable income to live off.

Depreciation – another form of income that property investing provides us is tax deductions in the form of depreciation allowances. The Australian Taxation
Office allows property investors to depreciate the value of their investment properties and claim the amounts as tax deductions against the income. Maximum
depreciation benefits can generally be achieved from new properties however renovated older properties can also provide significant depreciation benefits.
When we started investing in property, our strategy included purchasing brand new properties with high levels of depreciation so that we could utilize the
tax benefits to sustain the investment property while it grew in value. Depreciation schedules can be obtained from registered Quality Surveyors while your
accountant should be consulted for tax deductibility of the items on the schedule.

Equity – is why we invest in property. Equity can be defined as the amount that a property has increased in value over time for example, if you buy a property
for $300k and after some time it grows in value to $400k then the difference ($100k) is simply termed equity. Equity is great because you don’t have to work
hard to get it, it just happens over the course of time, even when you sleep. To accelerate your wealth creation the increased equity can then be taken out
and used as deposit(s) to purchase additional investment properties. This is basically how many of the well known and successful property investors built their
portfolios.

As our properties grow in value, we use the equity to purchase more and more properties. Equity grew quicker as we purchased more properties which in turn
accelerated our capacity to purchase more properties. Each time a property grew in value, we would revalue the property and draw down the available equity to
purchase the next opportunity. Some of our properties have grown by 30% yet had we tried to save this amount of money while working in the “rat race”, we would
never have been able to buy more than one property. Equity has given us the power to buy multiple properties in a very short time frame and grow our net wealth.

Appreciation – property values increase and decrease just like any other investment vehicle however when you look at property over the longer term, it generally
always increases in value and therefore provides low risk investing. We prefer property for this reason and put simply, people need somewhere to live. We have
approximately 120k people migrating into this great country each year and the size of our family units are reducing hence the requirement for more properties for
people to live in is on the increase. When looking to buy an investment property we look for areas that are experiencing population growth or are expected to grow
in the longer term. Population growth helps to ensure that there is demand for property and following the supply and demand principal, appreciation in property
prices is highest in areas of greatest demand. Our genuine wealth has come from our many properties appreciating in value over time.

Leverage – in property investing terms can be defined as the ability to do more with less. Leverage is by far the most powerful feature in property investing and
has got to be one of the many wonders of the world. Without it we would still be trying to buy our first investment property. Leverage has allowed us to maximize
what we have and to create serious wealth. Borrowing more on an investment property than what you paid for it is what leveraging is all about. How great is that.
You can use someone else’s money i.e. the banks to grow your wealth. Banks will lend you up to 80% of the value of the property and in some cases, borrow more at
competitive interest rates. Property allows more borrowing capacity than any other investment class because the banks view it as low risk.

Put more simply you are required to put in less of your own money up front when investing in property than you would if you were investing in any other investment
class. This means that you will be able grow your portfolio much quicker because you will need less of your own money than you would with other asset classes. If
you can at least double the return on what it costs you to own an investment property then you are ahead of the game and on your way to creating serious wealth.
The more that you can borrow at 7.5% interest that is returning 15%, the wealthier you will get.

How many other investment classes provide this many compounding benefits. For us property is the I.D.E.A.L investment class. We don’t know of any other investment
class that provides us with an income while at the same time allowing us to depreciate the assets’ value while at the same time watching the asset appreciate in value.
Appreciation of the asset increases the equity which in turn allows us to gain maximum leverage by borrowing to purchase more property. Repeating the cycle again and
again and again creates wealth at an ever increasing rate, how good is that.

Happy Investing

Paul Tooze

http://www.PropertyBooks.com.au

A leading resource for property investors

Investment in Mutual Funds

The money we earn is partly spent and the rest saved for meeting future expenses. Instead of keeping the savings idle we may like to use savings in order to get return on it in the future. This is called Investment. Investment means putting our money to work to earn more money. We needs to invest to earn return on our idle resources, to generate a specified sum of money for a specific goal in life and to make a provision for an uncertain future. One of the important reasons why one needs to invest wisely is to meet the cost of Inflation. Inflation is the rate at which the cost of living increases. The cost of living is simply what it costs to buy the goods and services you need to live. Inflation causes money to lose value because it will not buy the same amount of a good or a service in the future as it does now or did in the past. For example, if there was a 6% inflation rate for the next 20 years, a Rs. 100 purchase today would cost Rs. 321 in 20 years. This is why it is important to consider inflation as a factor in any long-term investment strategy. Remember to look at an investment’s ‘real’ rate of return, which is the return after inflation. The aim of investments should be to provide a return above the inflation rate to ensure that the investment does not decrease in value. For example, if the annual inflation rate is 6%, then the investment will need to earn more than 6% to ensure it increases in value. If the after-tax return on your investment is less than the inflation rate, then your assets have actually decreased in value; that is, they won’t buy as much today as they did last year.

Mutual Fund

Mutual funds also offer good investment opportunities to the investors. Like all investments, they also carry certain risks. The investors should compare the risks and expected yields after adjustment of tax on various instruments while taking investment decisions. The investors may seek advice from experts and consultants including agents and distributors of mutual funds schemes while making investment decisions.

LITERATURE REVIEW

Mutual fund is a mechanism for pooling the resources by issuing units to the investors and investing funds in securities in accordance with objectives as disclosed in offer document. Investments in securities are spread across a wide cross-section of industries and sectors and thus the risk is reduced. Diversification reduces the risk because all stocks may not move in the same direction in the same proportion at the same time. Mutual fund issues units to the investors in accordance with quantum of money invested by them. Investors of mutual funds are known as unit holders.The profits or losses are shared by the investors in proportion to their investments. The mutual funds normally come out with a number of schemes with different investment objectives which are launched from time to time. A mutual fund is required to be registered with Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI) which regulates securities markets before it can collect funds from the public.

Fig. referred to mutual fund.com(Mutual Fund Operation Flow Chart)

Unit Trust of India was the first mutual fund set up in India in the year 1963. In early 1990s, Government allowed public sector banks and institutions to set up mutual funds. In the year 1992, Securities and exchange Board of India (SEBI) Act was passed. The objectives of SEBI are – to protect the interest of investors in securities and to promote the development of and to regulate the securities market. As far as mutual funds are concerned, SEBI formulates policies and regulates the mutual funds to protect the interest of the investors. SEBI notified regulations for the mutual funds in 1993. Thereafter, mutual funds sponsored by private sector entities were allowed to enter the capital market. The regulations were fully revised in 1996 and have been amended thereafter from time to time. SEBI has also issued guidelines to the mutual funds from time to time to protect the interests of investors. All mutual funds whether promoted by public sector or private sector entities including those promoted by foreign entities are governed by the same set of Regulations.

A mutual fund is set up in the form of a trust, which has sponsor, trustees, asset Management Company (AMC) and custodian. The trust is established by a sponsor or more than one sponsor who is like promoter of a company. The trustees of the mutual fund hold its property for the benefit of the unit holders. Asset Management Company (AMC) approved by SEBI manages the funds by making investments in various types of securities. Custodian, who is registered with SEBI, holds the securities of various schemes of the fund in its custody. The trustees are vested with the general power of superintendence and direction over AMC. They monitor the performance and compliance of SEBI Regulations by the mutual fund. SEBI Regulations require that at least two thirds of the directors of trustee company or board of trustees must be independent i.e. they should not be associated with the sponsors. Also, 50% of the directors of AMC must be independent. All mutual funds are required to be registered with SEBI before they launch any scheme. However, Unit Trust of India (UTI) is not registered with SEBI (as on January 15, 2002).

1. Schemes according to Maturity Period:

A mutual fund scheme can be classified into open-ended scheme or close-ended scheme depending on its maturity period.

  • Open-ended Fund/ Scheme

An open-ended fund or scheme is one that is available for subscription and repurchase on a continuous basis. These schemes do not have a fixed maturity period. Investors can conveniently buy and sell units at Net Asset Value (NAV) related prices which are declared on a daily basis. The key feature of open-end schemes is liquidity.

  • Close-ended Fund/ Scheme

A close-ended fund or scheme has a stipulated maturity period e.g. 5-7 years. The fund is open for subscription only during a specified period at the time of launch of the scheme. Investors can invest in the scheme at the time of the initial public issue and thereafter they can buy or sell the units of the scheme on the stock exchanges where the units are listed. In order to provide an exit route to the investors, some close-ended funds give an option of selling back the units to the mutual fund through periodic repurchase at NAV related prices. SEBI Regulations stipulate that at least one of the two exit routes is provided to the investor i.e. either repurchase facility or through listing on stock exchanges. These mutual funds schemes disclose NAV generally on weekly basis.

2.Schemes according to Investment Objective:

A scheme can also be classified as growth scheme, income scheme, or balanced scheme considering its investment objective. Such schemes may be open-ended or close-ended schemes as described earlier. Such schemes may be classified mainly as follows:

  • Growth / Equity Oriented Scheme

The aim of growth funds is to provide capital appreciation over the medium to long- term. Such schemes normally invest a major part of their corpus in equities. Such funds have comparatively high risks. These schemes provide different options to the investors like dividend option, capital appreciation, etc. and the investors may choose an option depending on their preferences. The investors must indicate the option in the application form. The mutual funds also allow the investors to change the options at a later date. Growth schemes are good for investors having a long-term outlook seeking appreciation over a period of time.

  • Income / Debt Oriented Scheme

The aim of income funds is to provide regular and steady income to investors. Such schemes generally invest in fixed income securities such as bonds, corporate debentures, Government securities and money market instruments. Such funds are less risky compared to equity schemes. These funds are not affected because of fluctuations in equity markets. However, opportunities of capital appreciation are also limited in such funds. The NAVs of such funds are affected because of change in interest rates in the country. If the interest rates fall, NAVs of such funds are likely to increase in the short run and vice versa. However, long term investors may not bother about these fluctuations.

  • Balanced Fund

The aim of balanced funds is to provide both growth and regular income as such schemes invest both in equities and fixed income securities in the proportion indicated in their offer documents. These are appropriate for investors looking for moderate growth. They generally invest 40-60% in equity and debt instruments. These funds are also affected because of fluctuations in share prices in the stock markets. However, NAVs of such funds are likely to be less volatile compared to pure equity funds.

  • Money Market or Liquid Fund

These funds are also income funds and their aim is to provide easy liquidity, preservation of capital and moderate income. These schemes invest exclusively in safer short-term instruments such as treasury bills, certificates of deposit, commercial paper and inter-bank call money, government securities, etc. Returns on these schemes fluctuate much less compared to other funds. These funds are appropriate for corporate and individual investors as a means to park their surplus funds for short periods.

  • Gilt Fund

These funds invest exclusively in government securities. Government securities have no default risk. NAVs of these schemes also fluctuate due to change in interest rates and other economic factors as is the case with income or debt oriented schemes.

  • Index Funds

Index Funds replicate the portfolio of a particular index such as the BSE Sensitive index, S&P NSE 50 index (Nifty), etc These schemes invest in the securities in the same weight age comprising of an index. NAVs of such schemes would rise or fall in accordance with the rise or fall in the index, though not exactly by the same percentage due to some factors known as “tracking error” in technical terms. Necessary disclosures in this regard are made in the offer document of the mutual fund scheme. There are also exchange traded index funds launched by the mutual funds which are traded on the stock exchanges.

3. Sector specific schemes

These are the funds/schemes which invest in the securities of only those sectors or industries as specified in the offer documents. E.g. Pharmaceuticals, Software, Fast Moving Consumer Goods (FMCG), Petroleum stocks, etc. The returns in these funds are dependent on the performance of the respective sectors/industries. While these funds may give higher returns, they are more risky compared to diversified funds. Investors need to keep a watch on the performance of those sectors/industries and must exit at an appropriate time. They may also seek advice of an expert.

4. Tax Saving Schemes

These schemes offer tax rebates to the investors under specific provisions of the Income Tax Act, 1961 as the Government offers tax incentives for investment in specified avenues. e.g. Equity Linked Savings Schemes (ELSS). Pension schemes launched by the mutual funds also offer tax benefits. These schemes are growth oriented and invest pre-dominantly in equities. Their growth opportunities and risks associated are like any equity-oriented scheme.

  • Load or no-load Fund

A Load Fund is one that charges a percentage of NAV for entry or exit. That is, each time one buys or sells units in the fund, a charge will be payable. This charge is used by the mutual fund for marketing and distribution expenses. Suppose the NAV per unit is Rs.10. If the entry as well as exit load charged is 1%, then the investors who buy would be required to pay Rs.10.10 and those who offer their units for repurchase to the mutual fund will get only Rs.9.90 per unit. The investors should take the loads into consideration while making investment as these affect their yields/returns. However, the investors should also consider the performance track record and service standards of the mutual fund which are more important. Efficient funds may give higher returns in spite of loads. A no-load fund is one that does not charge for entry or exit. It means the investors can enter the fund/scheme at NAV and no additional charges are payable on purchase or sale of units.

  • Assured return scheme

Assured return schemes are those schemes that assure a specific return to the unit holders irrespective of performance of the scheme. A scheme cannot promise returns unless such returns are fully guaranteed by the sponsor or AMC and this is required to be disclosed in the offer document. Investors should carefully read the offer document whether return is assured for the entire period of the scheme or only for a certain period. Some schemes assure returns one year at a time and they review and change it at the beginning of the next year.

Considering the market trends, any prudent fund managers can change the asset allocation i.e. he can invest higher or lower percentage of the fund in equity or debt instruments compared to what is disclosed in the offer document. It can be done on a short term basis on defensive considerations i.e. to protect the NAV. Hence the fund managers are allowed certain flexibility in altering the asset allocation considering the interest of the investors. In case the mutual fund wants to change the asset allocation on a permanent basis, they are required to inform the unit holders and giving them option to exit the scheme at prevailing NAV without any load. Mutual funds normally come out with an advertisement in newspapers publishing the date of launch of the new schemes. Investors can also contact the agents and distributors of mutual funds who are spread all over the country for necessary information and application forms. Forms can be deposited with mutual funds through the agents and distributors who provide such services. Now a days, the post offices and banks also distribute the units of mutual funds. However, the investors may please note that the mutual funds schemes being marketed by banks and post offices should not be taken as their own schemes and no assurance of returns is given by them. The only role of banks and post offices is to help in distribution of mutual funds schemes to the investors. Investors should not be carried away by commission/gifts given by agents/distributors for investing in a particular scheme. On the other hand they must consider the track record of the mutual fund and should take objective decisions.

The performance of a scheme is reflected in its net asset value (NAV) which is disclosed on daily basis in case of open-ended schemes and on weekly basis in case of close-ended schemes. The NAVs of mutual funds are required to be published in newspapers. The NAVs are also available on the web sites of mutual funds. All mutual funds are also required to put their NAVs on the web site of Association of Mutual Funds in India (AMFI) http://www.amfiindia.com and thus the investors can access NAVs of all mutual funds at one place. The mutual funds are also required to publish their performance in the form of half-yearly results which also include their returns/yields over a period of time i.e. last six months, 1 year, 3 years, 5 years and since inception of schemes. Investors can also look into other details like percentage of expenses of total assets as these have an affect on the yield and other useful information in the same half-yearly format. The mutual funds are also required to send annual report or abridged annual report to the unit holders at the end of the year. Various studies on mutual fund schemes including yields of different schemes are being published by the financial newspapers on a weekly basis. Apart from these, many research agencies also publish research reports on performance of mutual funds including the ranking of various schemes in terms of their performance. Investors should study these reports and keep themselves informed about the performance of various schemes of different mutual funds. Investors can compare the performance of their schemes with those of other mutual funds under the same category. They can also compare the performance of equity oriented schemes with the benchmarks like BSE Sensitive Index, S&P CNX Nifty, etc. On the basis of performance of the mutual funds, the investors should decide when to enter or exit from a mutual fund scheme

As already mentioned, the investors must read the offer document of the mutual fund scheme very carefully. They may also look into the past track record of performance of the scheme or other schemes of the same mutual fund. They may also compare the performance with other schemes having similar investment objectives. Though past performance of a scheme is not an indicator of its future performance and good performance in the past may or may not be sustained in the future, this is one of the important factors for making investment decision. In case of debt oriented schemes, apart from looking into past returns, the investors should also see the quality of debt instruments which is reflected in their rating. A scheme with lower rate of return but having investments in better rated instruments may be safer. Similarly, in equities schemes also, investors may look for quality of portfolio. They may also seek advice of experts.

Almost all the mutual funds have their own web sites. Investors can also access the NAVs, half-yearly results and portfolios of all mutual funds at the web site of Association of mutual funds in India (AMFI) http://www.amfiindia.com. AMFI has also published useful literature for the investors. Investors can log on to the web site of SEBI http://www.sebi.gov.in and go to “Mutual Funds” section for information on SEBI regulations and guidelines, data on mutual funds, draft offer documents filed by mutual funds, addresses of mutual funds, etc. Also, in the annual reports of SEBI available on the web site, a lot of information on mutual funds is given. There are a number of other web sites which give a lot of information of various schemes of mutual funds including yields over a period of time. Many newspapers also publish useful information on mutual funds on daily and weekly basis. Investors may approach their agents and distributors to guide them in this regard.

Books:

  • Beri, GC (1996), “Marketing Research”, Tata Mcgraw- Hill., New Delhi.
  • Kothari,C R (2005),”Research Methodology: Methods & Techniques”, Vishwa publication., New Delhi.
  • Kotler & Keller,(2006), “Marketing Management”, Printice Hall Of India Ltd., New Delhi.
  • Saxena, Rajan. (2003), ” Marketing Management”, Tata Mcgraw- Hill Publishing Company Limited, New Delhi.

Balanced Investment Strategy For Portfolio Management

Balanced investment strategy is perhaps the most followed and successful investment strategy for portfolio management. Its primary aim is to keep a balance between investment risk and return. A balanced investment strategy combines the merit of aggressive and defensive investing strategies.

Aggressive investment strategy involves investing in high return high risk investments with the sole purpose of maximizing return from investments. It involves allocating major portion of portfolio capital to invest in equities, equity based funds and highly volatile markets. Investors following aggressive investment strategy often look for comparatively short-term profiting and wish to invest more in growth stocks, and small caps and mid cap stocks. Advantages of aggressive investing include quick profit, high return over investment and no need of large portfolio capital. It can work really well for experienced investors and investors who are very strict in their money management. Disadvantages include high risk, high volatility in total portfolio value and no surety of profit. It less supports novice investors and investor looking for monthly earnings or living costs.

Defensive investment strategy is just opposite of aggressive investment; it’s purpose is to preserve the capital and ensure some return from investments. It involves investing in low profit low risk investments like bonds, money market funds, treasury notes, and equities with minimum price volatility and good dividends. Defensive investors look for long-term profits and/or monthly earnings. Advantages of defensive investment strategy include reduced risk, predictable income, better investment planning and diversification of portfolio. This strategy mainly suits beginners. Disadvantages include low return from investments and requirement of high capital investments.

In balanced investment strategy, the investor tries to keep a balance between his aggressive and defensive behaviors. It involves balancing of both return and risk by diversifying investments in both high return high risk and low return low risk investments. Balanced investors often follow a portfolio capital allocation rule telling how much to invest in equities and bonds and how much to invest in treasury notes, precious metals and funds. Usually one portion of portfolio is actively managed and other portion is left to grow automatically. Balanced investment strategy can be slightly aggressive or slightly defensive with respect to investments made.

The greatest advantage of balanced investment strategy is the diversification of portfolio and hedging against high total portfolio value volatility. It is good for investors looking for medium-term (3 to 5 years) profits. Other advantages include flexibility in portfolio management, better results with better capital investments, (almost) predictable income and manageable portfolio risk. Balanced investment strategy support both beginners and experienced investors and can be an option for monthly earnings for living.